Han Han can help you change the world

Two persons from China have impressed me very much in the recent months. First, a little cute girl who can be seen here playing “Souvenir D’enfance” by Richard Clayderman on the piano for a television show. In this video, she plays the entire song beautifully, despite a significant disadvantage, as her right hand is missing all of its fingers.

Comments have been pouring in after I posted this video on youtube. “So beautiful and talented. It demonstrates that you can become what you wish against all odds,” a visitor posted. Sure, where there is a will, there is a way. Believe you will watch and share the guts and determination of 19-year-old Zheng Guigui who comes from a small town in China’s Henan Province.

Now let’s talk about the other Chinese — Han Han – who reads the world and writes the future. He is actually a rally driver who blogs by mixing his wit and criticism of corruption, injustice and incompetence. “The government wants China to become a great cultural nation, but our leaders are so uncultured,” he told The New York Times earlier this year. “If things continue like this, China will only be known for tea and pandas.”

Perhaps this being in his mind, he attempted to launch a magazine – Party — for alternative thinkers. But, his great initiative which sold 1.5 mn copies collapsed after just one issue. He had to fold his publication and disband his editorial team. All this happened in 2010.

“Thanks to all the readers, thanks to all editors and staff. Our regret is that as a literary magazine which should have been given plenty of time for preparation, the first issue was not good enough, but unfortunately everyone has seen it.  We have made sufficient improvements in the second issue, but unfortunately no one can see it now,” Han Han posted.

I am given to understand that he dumped the magazine as 70 per cent of the original content was scrapped to secure approval for the publication of his first edition. Thus, I would call his decision bold. Why succumb to the people whose graves you must dig.

Han Han wanted to provide a good art publication with more free and wild writing from musicians, film directors and offbeat writers, but his idea seemed too good to be true. His blog, which attracts millions of visitors… may be… scared the Chinese authorities. Were they nervous of Han Han? Did they fear that he’d begin putting contents therein from his controversial novel – 1988: I Want to Talk with the World?

Time magazine put him in the bracket of 100 most influential people of 2009, grouping him alongside US President Barack Obama and pop star Lady Gaga. But, look how did he react: “If you really talk about being influential, you should meet those in control of the society’s resources and the country’s assets. You cannot find them on any search engines, but they are truly the influential people behind the scenes. If they simply use their hands, you’d be dead. But I only hope that these people will put their influence to beneficial use for the betterment of the people, not to do bad deeds. As for us, we can only push for developments in other aspects of society. I think as a literati, this is all I could do.”

I look to Han Han as the voice of the Chinese people. He has a cause. And I have been taught that the purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself. I want people like Han Han to rise both in East and West. I want them to be beyond anybody’s control.

One comment

  1. Reblogged this on The Gappuccino ~ g caffè ~ and commented:
    I look to Han Han as the voice of the Chinese people. He has a cause. And I have been taught that the purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself. I want people like Han Han to rise both in East and West. I want them to be beyond anybody’s control….by NEERAJ BHUSHAN.

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